Poet At Large Reviews, Streaming TV, Orange is the new Black   Leave a comment

On the 6th of June the second season of Orange is The New Black hit Netflix for streaming. The series is produced exclusively for Netflix and has found itself to be highly popular. It is not however for children and should be classified as porn.  Not every scene involves nudity, but there are graphic depictions of almost every imaginable sexual act.  They do not hold back about the lack of privacy in a prison, including uncensored shower scenes and strip searches.  I know some people will read this and think, “Oh I have to watch that show.” just because they find that stuff to be a turn on.

I say don’t watch it for the titillation, watch it for the plot if you are going to watch it. The story lines of how all these women got into one Federal prison are interesting. The black market the smuggling of things in and out. The turf war over job stations. The corruption among the warden and the staff. Much of it is a good example of why not to get yourself tossed in “The Litch” as Litchfield Penitentiary is called by it’s residents.

In the first season we met Piper Chapman. A woman from a upper middle class white suburban family who was convinced by a former lover to carry drug money. In the Pen she encounters not only her former lover, who turned her in, but a Russian cook who runs “The Litch’s” black market from her Russian Mafia contacts on the outside. (Payed by Kate Mulgrew of Star Trek and Mrs. Culombo fame.). A Jamaican woman who killed a man for raping a young girl. An insane black girl called Crazy Eyes who tries to make Piper her prison wife. A Nun who was part of a political movement. A transgendered woman who is fighting for the right to have her hormone pills, and a Meth head who shot an abortion nurse and has gone religiously nuts just to name a few.

At the end of season one Piper is in a very nasty looking fight with Meth Head Pensetucky. No one knows if Piper is going to end up Killing her attacker in self defense or not. At the beginning of season two we find ourselves with Piper in the SHU or segregated housing unit. She has received no word if Pensetucky is alive and before she knows it she is whisked off to Chicago by US Marshal transport to conditions that are much harder than “The Litch.” She is not told why, only that there is going to be a trial. Meanwhile back at Litchfield Pensetucky comes out of the SHU to face her fellow inmates and the fact that she now has most of her teeth knocked out. The prison counselor trades Pensetucky her silance about him not stopping the fight for a set of false teeth. Red the Russian cook is now barred from the kitchen because of the exposure of her smuggling ring by a guard who was forcing her to smuggle drugs with her other contraband. Drugs that killed at least one girl last season. A woman from Tasty’s past named V comes in to stir things up with her own smuggling operation. (Tasty is a black girl who works in the prison library.) A girl by the name of Brook also stirs up some of the other inmates to a hunger strike, and finally the administration finds out that Diya is pregnant allowing them to bring rape charges against the prison guard that was caught with her in the utility closet.

There is so much more that goes on, and each episode gives you more reason to think about how your own life might have gone wrong and you could have ended up like Piper.

From The Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You may contact The Poet and her friends by emailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com).

 

Poet At Large Reviews, App/Game, Farmville 2   Leave a comment

Farmville 2 by Zynga Games is a contrivance intended to separate fools from their money.  The first Farmville was fun to play on FaceBook until they added the notion that you needed to get materials for building your buildings and charging real money for the materials.  If you were patient enough to wait for the materials from your friends sending them as gifts you might spend a whole month trying to get a nail to finish your barn.  This need for materials also caused someone desperate enough to spam their own friends with requests for materials in a game that most of your friends did not play.  After a time I just gave up on playing the first version because I did not want to pay for virtual objects at such a high price.

I recently decided to play Farmville 2 and give it a try.  In 1 week I spent a little over $40 on FarmBucks.  Much of this was spent on baby formula for my animals. There are also so premium animals that I have bought.  These animals are nice to have because they produce more milk or eggs or wool.  Their price along with formula costs  makes them one thing I hate.  Pixels that eat.  This is a term for any virtual animal you buy which requires virtual food that you must also buy.  After they age to adulthood you can feed them from the crops you grow, but this does not excuse their real world price.  You can look at it as being no worse than splurging on candy or outright robbery.  Though it is more expensive to play Farmville 2 than World of Warcraft or have a premium account in Second Life. You also still need to buy certain building materials or wait for them as gifts if you don’t have the means to grow or make them yourself.  Though I do like the filter that lets you send requests to only the friends that play the game.

I don’t see myself continuing with the game for very long. I may like farm simulators but I would prefer one you buy on a disc and don’t have to pay any future fees to play. Like the old DOS based SimFarm game.

From The Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You may contact The Poet or her friends by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com).

Poet At Large Reviews, Book, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie: A Flavia de Luce Novel   Leave a comment

‘The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie: A Flavia de Luce Novel’ by Alan Bradly is the first book in the Flavia de Luce Series.  It introduces us to eleven year old Flavia, a very precocious young girl with a talent for chemistry and mysteries as well as a fascination for poisons.  When her father’s past lands him in jail as a murder suspect it is up to young Flavia to find the real killer. It all begins with a very rare stamp stolen just before the death of one of her father’s teachers when he was a school boy.  The intrigue will get Flavia into one dangerous situation after another until she finds the truth.

I found the character of Flavia to be delightful. I also found the rivalry between Flavia and her older sisters to be completely believable. The small English village that Flavia lives in is quaint and full of Characters that are easy to relate with. The final answer to who the murder is was well thought out. It does leave one with a desire for more and there are now several books in the series available for kindle.

From The Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You can Contact The Poet and her friends by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com)

Poet At Large Reviews, Childrens Books, The Strength of Wild Horses   Leave a comment

I usually review books intended for older readers but some times you come across a series meant for young kids that you wish was written when you were in Elementary School.  ‘The Strength of Wild Horse’ is the sequel to the 2008 book ‘Hold on to your Horses’. Both books are written by Sandra Tayler and illustrated by Angela Call.  The books are about a young girl named Amy who has ideas that are like wild horses and being young she has not yet learned the restraint to keep her ideas from running away with her.  In the first book ‘Hold on to Your Horses’ Amy learns something about leading her ideas instead of letting them lead her.  This is a stage in life that all young children must go through.

In the second book she learns to use her ideas to help those around her, like her older sister Kari. Kari has a terrible time trying to take care of Amy and their Baby brother while their parents are out one evening.  Just when Kari thinks nothing can go right Amy and her wild ideas save the day.  The books are filled with wonderful pictures that will take your breath away and sage advice that can be enjoyed by both young and old.  These books can be ordered by going to http://www.schlockmercenary.com and going into the Schlock Store. While you are there I suggest that you look for Sandra’s books “Cobble Stones 2011′ and ‘Cobble Stones 2012’ these books of essays selected from Sandra’s blog ‘One Cobble at a Time’ are very uplifting for adults to read.

From the Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You may contact the poet and her friends by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com)

Poet At Large Reviews, Book, Glacial Eyes   Leave a comment

J.K. Walker delivers a humorous tale of a orphaned WereSnowLeopard in ‘Glacial Eyes’. Jasmine “Jazz” Bedeau lost her parents at 14 and was raised by her Godmother from that point, but what her Godmother never knew is that Jasmine’s mother was a Chinese WereSnowLeopard and her father was not a mere mortal either.  Now Jazz is a grown woman attending collage in Salt Lake City, Utah at the University of Utah. When she and her best friend attend a party in Little Cottonwood Canyon a male collage student slips something into Jazz’s drink and tries to have his way with her only to have it end in his own death as she transforms for the first time in her life. After this tragic event Jazz is put on trial by the Supernatural community for manslaughter and risking exposure. When they realize she does not even know what she is they put her on probation and then she has to face a serial killer who likes to take the teeth of Were creatures as trophies.

Being a Utah native I am familiar with many of the places named in the book. I had to read the book twice before I could post a review. It is a good story and hard to put down, but it does have a few tense and pronoun mix ups that show it was not proof read as much as it needed.  There is also a matter of having Jazz introduce Her roommate to a certain witch twice. I think the second time the author only intended to have Jazz hint to her roommate that the witch in question was into girls because the roommate dates both.

Though the characters are in Utah only one is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I have no problem with that even though I am a Mormon myself. I do think that there is a little too much detail in the love scenes. I’m not a prude and have no problem with people kissing or cuddling or being naked but I don’t need descriptions of sexual intercourse or orgasm to enjoy a book. Aside from that I recommend that readers be at least familiar with ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail’ and the ‘Ghostbuster’ films from the 1980s if you want to understand the jokes.

From The Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You can reach The Poet and her friends by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com)

Poet At Large Reviews, Book, Dan Shamble Zombie P.I. Hair Raising   Leave a comment

Kevin J. Anderson has done it again with the novel ‘Hair Raising’.  Dan Chambeaux of Chambeaux and Deyer has his work cut out for him when the world Horror convention comes to the Unnatural Quarter.  Recent novels written by ‘Penny Dreadful’ have turned the zombie into a celebrity, whether he like it or not.  A gang war between monthly werewolves and full time werewolves is getting out of hand.  Werewolves are being scalped, but is it really rival gang members doing the scalping.  Add to that a booming business in black market body parts for mad scientists and a crematory that is failing to cremate it’s clients before they manage to rise from the dead.  The Whole point of cremation in the era after the big Uneasy. Then toss in one Harpy with a bad luck problem and stir.

The book is filled with the wonderful humor and plot twists that make the Dan Shamble stories so wonderful to read.  The characters of the Unnatural quarter are now familiar to us but each story adds new levels to that world.  I do hope we will see more of Dan and his friends in the future.

From The Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

The Poet and her friends can be reached by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com)

Poet At Large Reviews, Live Theatre, Spanish Fork Youtheatre Presents, Beauty and The Beast Jr.   Leave a comment

I mentioned in my last post that it is important to encourage our children and our community.  This last Wednesday night found me once again in a High School Auditorium.  This time the one at Spanish Fork High School for the Spanish Fork Youtheatre production of ‘Disney’s Beauty and The Beast’.  My motivation for traveling to see the play was very personal.  One of the Sheep in the second scene was played by my ginger haired 11 year old daughter.  My daughter who I refer to as Roo on line lives with her grandmother in Spanish Fork.  This makes attending things like plays even more important.  Later in the play she also appears as a wolf and as a village girl.

I would have to say that the children in this production (who range in age from 8 to high school seniors) did very well with the iconic material given them.  Though I might suggest that any alumni of the Spanish Fork High school who want to make a charitable contribution to the school earmark it for new radio microphones and an update of the Auditorium sound system.  At various points during the play each character would suddenly not be audible and then would be heard for a few seconds then gone again.  This was of course a little frustrating.

The dancing and the costumes were spot on with the movie which captured my heart as a child. The story though, perhaps gains a bit more depth as certain songs that were never added to the movie become part of it.  The charm of children dressed as the dog/footstool and the cat/pillow make you laugh and two young sisters with gymnastic inclinations who take on the role of floor rugs will make you smile.

Tani Lee who plays the part of Belle is a delight and able to improvise when there is a problem on stage.  She has a voice that I’m certain has been trained to project, which made it easier when her microphone failed.  Taylor McEntire’s Beast was very believable when it came to emotion and his transformation scenes are wonderful unless  you have a problem with strobe lights.  So be warned that if you are an epileptic and chose to go to the play close your eyes when those two scenes happen.  The flirtation between Brandon Bundy as Lumiere and Danielle Gardner as Babette the feather duster is every bit as funny as it was in the movie.  Jayce Komiya’s Cogsworth is worthy of David Ogden Stiers who originally voiced the roll for the movie.  Marshayla Nielson’s Mrs. Potts is believable and her rendition of the title song is a treat.  Talon Tippets makes a very enthusiastic Lefou but Nate Taylor needs to get past his timidity and be a bit more nasty as well as project from the diaphragm to be a more believable Gaston.

All this said I look forward to Saturday when I will go to see the play a second time with family that had to work on Wednesday.

From the Poet’s Mouth,

Lyda Mae Dameron

You can reach The Poet and her friends by e-mailing (ravendove922@yahoo.com)